Monday, February 13, 2017

Week 2 Discussion: BORN A CRIME by Trevor Noah #12mos12rals

born a crime

Welcome to our second discussion of Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Today we'll be finishing up Part I of the book. To check out our first week's discussion, go here.




  1. What do you think were the themes in Part I of the book? How were the essays tied together? Asking for a friend.
  2. In Chapter 4, Noah talks about the power of language and how it can overcome–or at the very least confuse–racism. He says if people speak the same language, they recognize one another as members of the same "tribe," even if they look completely different. "Maybe I didn't look like you, but if I spoke like you, I was you." Do you think this is true?
  3. What would you do if you came home and found out your kid had burned down someone's house?
  4. In Chapter 7, Noah talks about his dog Fufi and how she basically formed his entire philosophy regarding relationships. What do you think of this philosophy, and does this simile really work after you start thinking about it?
  5. Which chapter made you cry more, the one where Noah meets his father as an adult or the first chapter?
  6. Anything else that surprised you or you want to discuss?




Thanks for joining our discussion! If you posted about Born a Crime on your blog, please link back to it here so we don't miss it. Or feel free to post your responses in the comments.

Don't miss our next discussion on Monday, February 20th, where we'll cover all of Part II. See you then!

2 comments :

  1. hmm, looks like you need to upgrade your Mister Linky. So here is the link to my post: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/02/13/born-a-crime-4-8-read-along-at-book-bloggers-international/

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  2. I have to say that this book is nothing what I expected, and is such a fabulous read. It makes me think, for example, the racism vs language question asked above. He brings in different perspectives, frequently challenging my beliefs and I have found myself marking multiple quotes and paragraphs within the text. I will eventually try to collate all of these, but I feel like I am still trying to process Noah's stories.

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